WCNA

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 14 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #48548
      WCNA
      Participant

      Thanks for doing this. I thought about doing one myself but I don’t have the time anymore.

    • #47611
      WCNA
      Participant

      For me it was WarGames.

      Ditto

    • #47739
      WCNA
      Participant

      Check out airmon-ng. Then run wireshark on mon0.

    • #46589
      WCNA
      Participant

      I look forward to seeing this film. I watch a lot of movies and it’s good to see a film like this being made.

    • #46128
      WCNA
      Participant

      The waiting is the second hardest part, with the exam being the first. I somehow missed my results (I actually think they got lost in the mail) and had to contact them. If for some reason, you don’t pass, don’t beat yourself up too bad. The test, as you know is brutal. There’s no other word for it. There were many when I took mine who were on their 2nd or third try.

      When I walked out of the exam, I had NO idea whether I passed or not and that is unusual for me. I generally have have an idea about how close I came but with the CISSP- nothing.
      Good luck. If you don’t hear from them in a week or so, give them a call.

    • #47177
      WCNA
      Participant

      I’ve got an asus eee pc 1005 ha netbook that runs backtrack just fine. Search google for linux compatible laptops. There’s a site out there that lists laptops known to work with different flavors of linux.

    • #46762
      WCNA
      Participant

      In your study of the legitimate wireless traffic, was it using dhcp? If he’s trying to lock you out, it’s possible that he’s using dhcp and is only allowing a dhcp range of one address. The packet capture should give you a clear idea of why you can’t connect.

    • #46757
      WCNA
      Participant

      I agree with Dragon. You need to study the legitimate traffic to see what works. Capture the traffic. Packets don’t lie.

    • #46222
      WCNA
      Participant

      Thank you Vivek for another great series!

    • #46035
      WCNA
      Participant

      @knwminus wrote:

      I was thinking of getting the Linux+ as a primer to the RHCSA/RHCE since I don’t actually work with linux professionally. There are a lot of Network Engineer jobs in my area that want Unix/Linux knowledge. After CCNP:S in a couple of months I might pick up Linux+/LPIC-1 for fun along with CWNA/CWSP (which not very many people have in my neck of the woods). We will see. I might just hold off and go towards RHCSA/RHCE. Linux+ is pretty expensive.

      My new job, which is in wireless, is 85% Linux. The CWNA was a requirement but the interviews had a BUNCH of linux questions. You didn’t need a cert but you absolutely had to know a lot about grep, ps, log files, cut, sed, etc.

    • #45886
      WCNA
      Participant

      How about?

      Hacking Wired And Wireless Keyboards Using Electromagnetic Emanations
      http://www.securitytube.net/video/215

      or just about anything at http://www.willhackforsushi.com/

    • #45279
      WCNA
      Participant

      I would start with learning all you can from the megaprimer videos on securitytube.net. Click on the “Groups” tab to see all the megaprimers.

    • #36368
      WCNA
      Participant

      Sorry to hear about this. BUT don’t sweat it. It sounds like you learned a lot and that is the most important thing there is.

    • #45115
      WCNA
      Participant

      OK here’s the deal. Residents plugging in a LAN port on their wireless router into the internet wall jack (supplied by the complex) used to be the bane of my existence in my former job. I used to hunt them down daily.

      You first need to know what the correct address scheme is for the internet provided by the complex. Frequently they will use something different than the 192.168.x.x network most home wireless routers use. If your wireless router is working, it is probably due to it still holding on to a correct address. Log in to your router and look at the WAN address from your ISP.

      You can usually statically assign yourself an address (after ping sweeping the space to make sure you don’t use an address already in use) if you keep receiving an incorrect address from the rogue router.

      If you really want to, you could check out my video on dhcdrop on securitytube.net. It will use up all the addresses from the rogue router, making it more likely for you and others to receive a correct DHCP address.

      OR you could just inform your ISP and if they are worth a damn, they’ll come out, track down the offender and disconnect them. Also, if they have left the password as default (as these kind of people usually do), you could log in to the D-link and turn off DHCP. I used to walk people through doing this over the phone to prevent a truck roll. Legal? It was for us because we were the ISP and they were breaking their TOS.

    • #44765
      WCNA
      Participant

      Laura’s course is NOT a security course. It covers the same material as in the book she wrote. It just makes it easier because you are following along in the traces she demonstrates. It is not a substitute for a GCIA or OSCP or any other security course. As I said that’s comparing apples and oranges. What you will learn is how to dissect packets so later on, you’ll understand how an attack does what it does at a packet level. It covers a few attacks but mainly it’s about all the other stuff you can use Wireshark for like troubleshooting http, ftp, dhcp, etc. 

Viewing 14 reply threads

Copyright ©2021 Caendra, Inc.

Contact Us

Thoughts, suggestions, issues? Send us an email, and we'll get back to you.

Sending

Sign in with Caendra

Forgot password?Sign up

Forgot your details?