BillV

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    • #177666
      BillV
      Participant

      I’ll be here, whenever anyone is ready to start the party πŸ™‚

    • #177664
      BillV
      Participant

      Haha, only like 8 years late πŸ™‚ that’s okay, I’ll reply to that one 2 years later – glad you got it sorted!

    • #168927
      BillV
      Participant
    • #168926
      BillV
      Participant

      Great book! Definitely enjoyed it. Thanks for the opportunity to write the review πŸ™‚

    • #168925
      BillV
      Participant

      There are a LOT of various, regional conferences. If you can give us a rough location, like Don suggested, I’m sure we can point you to something significantly cheaper than $1,000 near you.

    • #168890
      BillV
      Participant

      Nice! Can’t go wrong with any of those. I still have the eLS stuff on my radar – will be getting back on track with that next year or possibly late this year.

    • #168889
      BillV
      Participant

      Sweet. Enjoy BH/DC! I won’t be making it but will keep an eye on the thread for future meetups. Post back on how the conference’s go.

    • #168330
      BillV
      Participant

      Is this available as a recording anywhere by chance?

    • #168327
      BillV
      Participant

      I would say that’s a pretty accurate description (of most certifications really). I haven’t seen the newer ECSA/LPT stuff so I don’t know what that looks like these days but those have practical components now (as does the new CEH offering). I have not heard anything about the CHFI getting a practical. Otherwise yes, CEH and CHFI definitely both on the entry-level side of things focused on fundamentals and a baseline of knowledge.

      If I were going to move into forensics, I would probably go get one of the other neutral certifications along with one of the tool certifications. From the neutral perspective, there’s the CFCE from IACIS and the CCE from ISFCE (ISC2 briefly offered the CCFP but it’s no longer available). The CFCE would probably be the one of choice, as it looks more difficult to obtain (subject to multiple peer-reviewed practicals, plus an exam) and is likely more valuable as a result.

      Then I’d pick a tool of preference (either EnCase or FTK) and do the associated certification. This would also be dependent on employer too in the event they already have a tool.

    • #151561
      BillV
      Participant

      For sure πŸ™‚ Good to see you around. Hopefully a bunch of oldies will crawl back – and I’m sure we’ll get a whole slew of new peeps too.

    • #137272
      BillV
      Participant

      Absolutely. Is there a specific forum you’d prefer that be posted in?

      Also, what happened to the “generic” forum board? I thought we had a big one for “everything else” discussion but didn’t see that one in the listing.

    • #135437
      BillV
      Participant

      Awesome! πŸ™‚ Nice work, Don (as per usual). And props to the eLS crew too.

    • #54132
      BillV
      Participant

      What are the better options? Depends how you define ‘better’ and what you’re looking for. If you’re looking for a predictable schedule and going to the same place all the time, then the typical 9-to-5 is what you may be after. If you want to travel, see different organizations, and (more likely) charge more, then consulting may be for you.

      Candidate qualifications and skills? I don’t know if you mean a degree or certification in terms of ‘qualification’ but I think experience trumps everything. A degree and/or certification will help show interest, foundations, possibly advanced skill sets, but your experience will likely speak for itself at that point.

      Web application security is of high value, as many targets are breached via web application. Between that and mobile devices, I think the value will remain for at least some time.

      I don’t know what MNC is, so can’t answer some of your questions.

      Again, the career choice is up to you. Do what you enjoy doing. If you’re looking for something specific other than that, you may want to evaluate your reason for being in the profession.

      Good luck.

    • #54086
      BillV
      Participant

      Okay, so here’s the short/summarized version:

      “We suggest first learning C due to its simplicity, effectiveness, and ubiquity.” They reference the following books:
      The C Programming Language (Brian Kernighan and Dennis Ritchie – Prentice Hall, 1998)
      C: A Reference Manual (Samuel Harbison – Prentice Hall 2002
      Expert C Programming: Deep C Secrets (Peter van der Linden – Prentice Hall 1994
      Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools (Alfred Aho, Ravi Sethi, and Jeffrey Ullman – Prentice Hall 1994)
      Linkers and Loaders (John Levine – Morgan Kaufmann 1999)
      Advanced Compiler Design and Implementation (Steven Muchnick – Morgan Kaufmann 1997)

      Then “once you have a good understanding of how programs are generally written, executed and debugged”:
      Intel 64 and IA-32 Architectures Software Developer’s Manual Vol 1: Basic Architecture (Intel, special attn to Chapters 2-7)
      Cortex-A Series Programmer’s Guide *
      ARM Architecture Reference Manual ARMv7-A and ARMv7-R Edition *
      * if you’re interested in ARM
      Structured Computer Organization (Andrew Tanenbaum – Prentice Hall 1998)
      Microsoft PE and COFF Specification

      “Next, you should explore the operating system”:
      Modern Operating Systems (Andrew Tanenbaum – Prentice Hall 2005)
      Windows NT Device Driver Development (Peter Viscarola and Anthony Mason – New Riders Press 1998)
      What Makes It Page? The Windows 7 (x64) Virtual Memory Manager (Enrico Martignetti – CreateSpace 2012)
      Windows System Programming (Johnson Hart – Addison-Wesley 2010)
      Windows via C/C++ (Jeffrey Richter and Christophe Nasarre – Microsoft Press 2007)

      Inside Windows Debugging: A Practical Guide to Debugging and Tracing Strategies in Windows (Tarik Soulami – Microsoft Press 2012)
      Advanced Windows Debugging (Mario Heardt and Daniel Pravat – Addison-Wesley 2007)

      Surreptitious Software: Obfuscation, Watermarking, and Tamperproofing for Software Protection (Christian Collberg and Jasvir Nagra – Addison-Wesley 2009)

      …and that’s all in the Introduction of the book I linked to, of recommended reading prior to moving on to Chapter 1 πŸ™‚

    • #54052
      BillV
      Participant

      Nice review of the course. It’s well summarized and sounds like a pretty sweet class to take. I haven’t heard of the organization before either so definitely going to take a closer look. Thanks.

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