rohanjoshi0894

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      rohanjoshi0894
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      The best way by far is to decide on a type of program you wish to create, and then truck through creating it. Always do “Hello World” first.
      There’s no real programming with that.

      1. Just download the SDK, see online what Java’s Hello World looks like via a Google Search, copy and paste that and run it.

      2. understand what everything in Hello World means.
      3. What does “class” mean?
      4. What can you do with it?
      5. Why do you need a class?
      6. Examples.
      “public static void main(String args[]) {…”

      7. Arguments of your main function?

      If you got this far, you probably have enough confidence to dive into something more substantial. You’ve learned you can work through some basic tasks and figure out things.

      So that’s when you dive into a book. A user-friendly book with hands-on examples that you can play with. Not one that tries to challenge you with puzzles. Go to a bookstore and find one that is focused on teaching you things, and telling you other things you can try, and how. It hopefully goes over how to create a JUnit test and introduces you to an IDE (Eclipse suggested because it’s free and powerful) and maybe a build tool such as maven as well.

      Now read the book from cover to cover. Especially pay attention to the explanations of why something is the way it is. As you learn about higher-level features such as HashMaps, try to dive in a bit on your own and learn the internals of things. How in-memory are things stored so they work as they do? How internally does a HashMap change as lots of data is added to it? Garbage collection is handy, but how exactly does it work? How can you control when things are collected and when they are left alone? Can you change how garbage collection works in other ways? Just keep asking questions as you read this book cover to cover.

      Read the latest edition of Josh Bloch’s Effective Java, cover to cover.

      The rest of your Java expertise can easily come from your own projects, but don’t be afraid of tracing through other people’s projects, and figuring out how everything works, and why they made the decisions they did. Lots of open source code out there to tinker with.

      You want me to come up with an estimate in hours for all this? I don’t like hour estimates. We’ll talk in weeks, where each week is 40 hours. The first week can be devoted to setting up and experimenting with Java. Reading a book and doing the exercises and side-investigations along the way… I’d give it 12 weeks. Then to go through and fully comprehend Josh Bloch’s book, maybe another 5 weeks? Then taking on your own serious project… it varies greatly based on what you choose, but I’ll pull another 12 weeks to get it up and running in some form. What is that, like 7 months or so? If you’re that focused on Java for 7 months, yeah, you’ll be pretty solid.

      About Java Certification, Go with these Certifications:

      1. Oracle Certified Associate Java Programmer (OCAJP) [Java SE 8 Programmer I]
      2. Oracle Certified Associate Java Programmer (OCAJP) [Java SE 11 Programmer I]
      3. Oracle Certified Professional Java Programmer (OCPJP) [Java SE 8 Programmer II]
      4. Oracle Certified Professional Java Programmer (OCPJP) [Java SE 11 Programmer II]
      5. Oracle Certified Professional Java Application Developer (OCPJAD)
      6. Oracle Certified Master Java Enterprise Architect (OCMJEA)

      To know more about this Java certification go with our blog post.

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