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Noob Question

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TechMonK3y

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Post Thu Dec 30, 2010 9:15 am

Noob Question

I have been researching and researching on what schools are the best for training in ethical hacking or pentesting  and have still came up empty. I mean which one is better to have i know some parts are the same but then you have offensive security with their version of pentesting with back track. Any info on this would help especially if you have completed some of these certs
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sgt_mjc

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Post Thu Dec 30, 2010 9:21 am

Re: Noob Question

What industry are you looking to get into?  The DoD recognizes a few certifications as meeting training requirements.  CEH, CISSP, and CompTIA Security + are just a few. This is not an all inclusive list but it may help. However, any Ethical Hacking cert will help you gain more knowledge.  The Offsec cert is a great cert and is very hands on.  It is not for some one new to Linux or ethical hacking. Before going straight to the hacking certs, look at the Security+ and the Network+ certs.  Then build from there.
Mike Conway
CISSP
CompTia Security +
C|EH
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TechMonK3y

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Post Thu Dec 30, 2010 11:21 am

Re: Noob Question

I am just looking to expand my areas I have a degree in networking and currently work in that field just trying to get some ideas on what next i heard that the OffSec was tough i do have some knowledge of linux not as much as i would like to
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rabray

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Post Sat Jan 15, 2011 8:58 am

Re: Noob Question

Install linux on a laptop or your home system and get started.

I would also recommend reading the CEH materials as a good place to start, you do get a broad understanding of various issues around security.

eCPPT is also good in terms of making you focus on web application testing and the security issues surrounding this area, which realy should become more of a challenge and focused role as more people move into the "cloud".
---------------------------------------
CEH, eCPPT, MCT, MCSA, MCDST, A+, Net+

Never been the flamin type.
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Pookie

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Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 11:46 am

Re: Noob Question

rabray wrote:Install linux on a laptop or your home system and get started.


I have been using Ubuntu/Mint Linux as my primary OS(es) for almost 2 years but don't feel like I truly know Linux since most of what I use is accessed through the graphical interface.  What commands and skills would you suggest I look into?  I was thinking of getting some books for the Comptia Linux+ cert, since that gets 3 certs for the price of one.  do you think that would help me learn best?
Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+
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RoleReversal

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Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 11:56 am

Re: Noob Question

Pookie,

in my experience trying to 'learn' Linux never works, as I can't retain anything I learn for when I actually need to use the knowledge in real life. Only way I can improve my Linux skills is to actually use it.

If you're mostly using the GUI, don't (I know, sorry) try running on a system without a GUI (all my servers are CLI only), for example take advantage of one of the many free/cheap virtual service hosts and use that to setup something that you're interested in. Or if you don't have a project in mind, setup a LAMP system to run a wiki/blog for you to record the skills/knowledge you're learning whilst doing it.

The knowledge comes with time, in my case I was working on a system (throwing commands at it, seeing what it does) and had an out of body experience, "when did I learn to do that?". It's easier to learn when you don't know you're learning.
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ziggy_567

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Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 12:06 pm

Re: Noob Question

I'm not that familiar with the Linux+ certification, but I can tell you that Linux is really pretty easy to learn once you get your hands dirty a bit. My advice would be to stop relying on the GUI for day-to-day maintenance of your destkop. If you need to update some software, don't use the graphical aptitude repositories, see what you can do on the command line. It may take longer, but you'll get more comfortable with the command line over time, and eventually it becomes faster to use the command line for a lot of things.

Another thing you can do, turn off automatic log rotation and write your own script to do this. This is on a junior sysadmin level of task, so its definitely doable. In fact, google will likely spoonfeed you pretty much whatever you need. But, this is a great exercise to teach yourself shell scripting. You will be amazed at how quickly you'll be able to string a bunch of commands together to accomplish a single task once you become somewhat proficient at shell scripting, because that's basically all you're doing with a shell script.

Another idea to learn command line. Build a VM without installing Gnome or KDE. Then set up an LAMP server on it. You don't have to actually do anything in depth with html/mysql/php. Just get a very rudimentary website setup. You'll learn a lot about the command line doing this.

Feel free to PM me if you need anything.
--
Ziggy


eCPPT - GSEC - GCIH - GWAPT - GCUX - RHCE - SCSecA - Security+ - Network+
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DrivinTin

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Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 2:36 pm

Re: Noob Question

In my opinion if you are going to really learn linux you don't go with Ubuntu or some other drop in install.  Go grab the min install cd of Gentoo and work your way through the install guide.  Not only will it help you setup a base system, but Gentoo has an amazing amount of HOWTOs and a great community for trouble shooting issues.
Currently working on:
A UAV Project
Speaking and conferences
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Pookie

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Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 3:38 pm

Re: Noob Question

I am getting a new computer (to me anyway) soon so I will have an opportunity to do these things,  since my old computer is an ancient beast and can barely handle one OS, much less virtual machines. 

Thanks to those who have replied to my Linux questions and I hope more people add their opinions and advice.
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hell_razor

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Post Tue Jan 25, 2011 4:31 pm

Re: Noob Question

DrivinTin wrote:In my opinion if you are going to really learn linux you don't go with Ubuntu or some other drop in install.  Go grab the min install cd of Gentoo and work your way through the install guide.  Not only will it help you setup a base system, but Gentoo has an amazing amount of HOWTOs and a great community for trouble shooting issues.


Ever heard of learning to crawl before you walk?  Throwing a new user in a minimal install in Gentoo may not be the best way to get a long term user.  I would say that installing any current mainstream enthusiast distro (ubuntu,fc,suse,etc) would be sufficient.  It will allow the user to have ease of use and still allow the user to compile code, update the kernel, etc. at their own pace.

This is kind of like learning to ride a motorcycle for the first time on a modern sportbike...it can be done, but may also result in a quick death.
A+, Network+, Server+, CISSP, GSEC, GCIH, GPEN, GCIA, GISP, GCFW
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DrivinTin

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Post Thu Jan 27, 2011 10:59 am

Re: Noob Question

hell_razor wrote:Ever heard of learning to crawl before you walk?  Throwing a new user in a minimal install in Gentoo may not be the best way to get a long term user.  I would say that installing any current mainstream enthusiast distro (ubuntu,fc,suse,etc) would be sufficient.  It will allow the user to have ease of use and still allow the user to compile code, update the kernel, etc. at their own pace.

This is kind of like learning to ride a motorcycle for the first time on a modern sportbike...it can be done, but may also result in a quick death.


I agree if the user is a new linux user, but the reply was more at Pookie.  He said he had been using Ubuntu for over 2 years, but feels like he still doesn't know linux that well because of the GUI. Walking through the Gentoo install guide is not daunting at all, it walks you through the entire process telling you every command to type. If you find that overwhelming then I think the Linux+ might not be for you.
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Speaking and conferences
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hell_razor

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Post Thu Jan 27, 2011 1:56 pm

Re: Noob Question

Just because Ubuntu/Mint have GUIs doesn't mean he should jump ship on the distro and move to something else.  He can learn everything he needs to in Ubuntu/Mint, he just needs to take the time to do so.  I am not trying to start a distro war or anything like that, at the root they are all about the same.  However, if I was looking to learn more about linux from nearly any front (support, pen testing, etc) I would look to redhat, centos, and debian based distros because that is what you will see more of in the wild.  If I were to branch someone out, I would send them to BSD world rather than some other linux distro.  Did not mean to start a fight or anything.
A+, Network+, Server+, CISSP, GSEC, GCIH, GPEN, GCIA, GISP, GCFW
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ziggy_567

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Post Thu Jan 27, 2011 2:08 pm

Re: Noob Question

<sarcasm>
Awwww....come on....DamnSmallLinux is where its at for building Desktops!
</sarcasm>

Linux is Linux...If you learn one, you can easily learn another...
--
Ziggy


eCPPT - GSEC - GCIH - GWAPT - GCUX - RHCE - SCSecA - Security+ - Network+
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DrivinTin

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Post Thu Jan 27, 2011 4:24 pm

Re: Noob Question

Haha, you are not a real man until you build your own Linux from Scratch!

hell_razor: I completely agree about being familiar with Redhat/CentOS/Debian, that is pretty much all you will find, and knowing the ends and outs is going to help you the most.

Now can someone find a great pic that shows a distro war? :)
Currently working on:
A UAV Project
Speaking and conferences
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Pookie

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Post Thu Jan 27, 2011 5:51 pm

Re: Noob Question

oops, I started a distro fight...  Sorry  :-[

I really do appreciate the input, I will likely set up a virtual machine on my new lappy with some minimal install (the Gentoo solution sounds interesting, and I have another target vm to practice on when I am done).  I also found some stuff at http://training.linuxfoundation.org/ to look into.

I have been branching over to the terminal for stuff (changing permissions, wget, iwconfig, and I think mtr is awesomely neat)  vi keeps throwing me off though but practice brings familiarity. 
Certifications: A+, Network+, Security+
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