.

Unix

<<

Thegmandrive

Newbie
Newbie

Posts: 43

Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2009 8:34 pm

Post Wed Feb 18, 2009 6:02 pm

Unix

I have a "Theory" so to speak. I know that Linux is one of the main "languages" hackers use, however, from my limited knowledge and understanding. Linux is UNIX based is it not? Mac OsX is also UNIX based? So I have started to learn UNIX, to improve my basic knowledge and understanding of Linux/Mac osX (I have a Mac and have some great ideas, just want to be able to put them into programming).


Do you think I'm on the right track? Or would it be a better use of my time to delve deeper in Linux and not bother with Unix?

I feel like I have a pretty good head for Networking, Computer Issue/Resolution, and some basic hacking. However, I "stand on the shoulders of giants" so to speak. In other words, I typically use others genius (such as there programs) to do most of my EH.
Any Ideas?
<<

NickFnord

User avatar

Full Member
Full Member

Posts: 117

Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:25 am

Post Thu Feb 19, 2009 4:57 am

Re: Unix

Linux and Unix are essentially the same thing, and for the purposes of beginning learning I would call them identical. 

linux, however is free (as in beer) and unix is generally not so I'd recommend getting linux. 

also it's my understanding that OSX is a cut-down/restricted/heavily customised version of unix, so you'd be better off starting with something like ubuntu (or even backtrack if you're going to use it purely for learning computer security stuff). 

What languages are you thinking of learning first?

(my personal recommendations are: C/C++ followed by Python and Perl, then brush up on SQL and database interaction if you don't already know it.)
<<

Thegmandrive

Newbie
Newbie

Posts: 43

Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2009 8:34 pm

Post Thu Feb 19, 2009 12:40 pm

Re: Unix

NickFnord wrote:Linux and Unix are essentially the same thing, and for the purposes of beginning learning I would call them identical. 

linux, however is free (as in beer) and unix is generally not so I'd recommend getting linux. 

also it's my understanding that OSX is a cut-down/restricted/heavily customised version of unix, so you'd be better off starting with something like ubuntu (or even backtrack if you're going to use it purely for learning computer security stuff). 

What languages are you thinking of learning first?

(my personal recommendations are: C/C++ followed by Python and Perl, then brush up on SQL and database interaction if you don't already know it.)


I learned VB, but found it to be very very limiting, so when I hit it's limit's I stopped learning it.

Thank you for the advice, I wasnt sure what language I was going to learn first. I have an Iphone, and I have a Terminal application on it. I have started learning some basic Unix commands, and found my little Iphone can do a lot of really big stuff :)

I will take your advice and start learning C/C++ I'm pretty sure sure Iphone apps use C, or at least a version of C. So that would kill two birds with one stone for me.

My main goal is to get better at at computer security stuff, so I will try to find a VmWare image of backtrack.

Thanks again for your advice to my noobieness type questions :) 
<<

NickFnord

User avatar

Full Member
Full Member

Posts: 117

Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 5:25 am

Post Fri Feb 20, 2009 5:02 am

Re: Unix

You just reminded me: VMware or some sort of virtualisation tool is really usefull - I purchased a VMware licence at the end of last year - best £100 I've spent.  nothing beats being able to "go back in time" with snapshots.  particularly when analysing malware.  also, if you're short on hardware (like me) it's good to be able to set up a virtual network to be able to use the tools included in backtrack without having to set up an expensive physical one.  also, if you trash the box you just revert to a snapshot!
<<

RoleReversal

User avatar

Hero Member
Hero Member

Posts: 928

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 8:54 am

Location: UK

Post Sat Feb 21, 2009 8:48 am

Re: Unix

NickFnord wrote:VMware or some sort of virtualisation tool is really useful
.... 
nothing beats being able to "go back in time" with snapshots.  particularly when analysing malware.   also, if you're short on hardware (like me) it's good to be able to set up a virtual network to be able to use the tools included in backtrack without having to set up an expensive physical one.  also, if you trash the box you just revert to a snapshot!


I'd agree with Nick, VMWare (or a.n.other virtualisation platform) should be the cornerstone of every lab. If you've got a box you can dedicate purely to testing and research take a look at VMWare ESXi. From my experience so far it is very powerful, and best of all it is free.

I'm currently in the process of moving my lab environment to a new virtualised setup. If you want some ideas, or just to see how badly I'm screwing things up, I'm keeping a log of my progress on my (pants) blog, first lab related post here
<<

Thegmandrive

Newbie
Newbie

Posts: 43

Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2009 8:34 pm

Post Sat Feb 21, 2009 8:29 pm

Re: Unix

RoleReversal wrote:
NickFnord wrote:VMware or some sort of virtualisation tool is really useful
.... 
nothing beats being able to "go back in time" with snapshots.  particularly when analysing malware.   also, if you're short on hardware (like me) it's good to be able to set up a virtual network to be able to use the tools included in backtrack without having to set up an expensive physical one.  also, if you trash the box you just revert to a snapshot!


I'd agree with Nick, VMWare (or a.n.other virtualisation platform) should be the cornerstone of every lab. If you've got a box you can dedicate purely to testing and research take a look at VMWare ESXi. From my experience so far it is very powerful, and best of all it is free.

I'm currently in the process of moving my lab environment to a new virtualised setup. If you want some ideas, or just to see how badly I'm screwing things up, I'm keeping a log of my progress on my (pants) blog, first lab related post here



Thank you :) I will be watching your blog.
<<

tarterp

Newbie
Newbie

Posts: 7

Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2007 1:58 am

Post Fri Feb 27, 2009 8:30 pm

Re: Unix

The questions I would pose for you to ask yourself is:

What type of tools are you wanting to write?
What architecture are you most familiar with?

If you are strong in one area than make this your focus and excel at it. I stick generally with Windows Programming even if sometimes I feel it would be easier on the *nix side, this is simply because I know the Windows architecture better.
<<

Thegmandrive

Newbie
Newbie

Posts: 43

Joined: Tue Feb 17, 2009 8:34 pm

Post Sun Mar 01, 2009 12:15 am

Re: Unix

I'm more of a Mac freak, which is why I was thinking Unix, but I think I got some advice to learn Linux & Python. I think I'm going to start :) thanks for all the advice.

Return to Programming

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

.
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group.
Designed by ST Software