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New here + books

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Mightygreen

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Post Sun Aug 18, 2013 5:45 am

New here + books

Hello, I'm new to here (as you can tell) currently deployed and I have been looking for books on TCP/IP protocols that are informative and easy to understand, but cover enough on the subject so that I have a firm grasp on it by the end. My current goal is to learn as much as I can while I'm in (can get free certs, books, classes, etc. due to my job, let alone military) so that when I get out I can fill an IT - Sys Admin billet eventually moving to Pen Testing. Also wouldn't mind advice on the subject of job security of Sys. Admin. types, I could easily move to NSA or military contracting, but not much of that is in places where my wife wants to live or near family (you with children will know how nice it is to have family to watch the kids every once in a while) and Sys. Admin. seems to be applicable everywhere.

Thanks for any replies!
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m0wgli

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Post Sun Aug 18, 2013 3:58 pm

Re: New here + books

Mightygreen wrote: I have been looking for books on TCP/IP protocols that are informative and easy to understand, but cover enough on the subject so that I have a firm grasp on it by the end.


These might not be "easy to understand" depending on your existing knowledge, but there definitely informative:

TCP/IP Illustrated, Volume 1: The Protocols.

RFCs for TCP/IP
Security + | OSWP | eCPPT (Silver & Gold) | CSTA
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dynamik

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Post Mon Aug 19, 2013 10:32 am

Re: New here + books

The "Illustrated" books are getting a bit dated. I prefer the TCP/IP guide nowadays: http://www.tcpipguide.com/

Also, check out the Wireshark certification book. Regardless of whether you want the certification, it'll help you master Wireshark, and you'll learn the protocols as you analyze gigs of pcaps.
The day you stop learning is the day you start becoming obsolete.
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Mightygreen

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Post Mon Aug 19, 2013 10:59 am

Re: New here + books

Okay thank you, I'll check out the two TCP/IP books, and I'll be sure to look at the Wireshark one, have played around with wireshark but due to lack of knowledge on the subject it is very confusing.
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unicityd

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Post Mon Aug 19, 2013 11:04 am

Re: New here + books

I loved the original TCP/IP Illustrated volume I, but it is dated now. The new edition, which m0wgli linked to, has been updated quite a bit but the work was done by a new author and I don't know how well it holds up to Stevens' original.

The TCP/IP Guide is awesome and I used it pretty frequently in my last job. But, I'd already read TCP/IP Illustrated a couple of times so I just used the TCP/IP Guide as a reference. Has anyone here tried using it as a first introduction to TCP/IP? How did it hold up? Was it an easy read? Difficult?
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El33tsamurai

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Post Mon Aug 19, 2013 2:20 pm

Re: New here + books

Just some questions for you so that any suggestions are not redundant on what you already seen. Any education on the subject self taught or education institutes? Any books or online resources you have already read?
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dynamik

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Post Mon Aug 19, 2013 3:05 pm

Re: New here + books

Mightygreen wrote:Okay thank you, I'll check out the two TCP/IP books, and I'll be sure to look at the Wireshark one, have played around with wireshark but due to lack of knowledge on the subject it is very confusing.


Just dive it. You'll learn a ton that way. Start with display filters for simple protocols like "icmp" and "arp" then work your way up to more complex protocols. It is indeed overwhelming if you try to analyze everything at once.

unicityd wrote:I loved the original TCP/IP Illustrated volume I, but it is dated now. The new edition, which m0wgli linked to, has been updated quite a bit but the work was done by a new author and I don't know how well it holds up to Stevens' original.

The TCP/IP Guide is awesome and I used it pretty frequently in my last job. But, I'd already read TCP/IP Illustrated a couple of times so I just used the TCP/IP Guide as a reference. Has anyone here tried using it as a first introduction to TCP/IP? How did it hold up? Was it an easy read? Difficult?


Ah, my mistake. I didn't realize there was a new one. I'd be interested in feedback on this as well.

I originally got the TCP/IP Guide as a reference, but I ran through it from cover-to-cover for my GCIA prep, and it's definitely "readable".
The day you stop learning is the day you start becoming obsolete.
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Mightygreen

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Post Tue Aug 20, 2013 3:50 am

Re: New here + books

El33tsamurai: I currently have many books and am working my way through them trying to stay in order where I learn about a subject before I encounter it in a book (such as Ubuntu Pocket Guide before Bash Beginner Guide, or TCP/IP before an NMap book). So far I have read a few short Linux guides, a basic TCP/IP for beginners (out-dated, very short), part of a pen testing book (before I realized I was way over my head, and decided to back out and familiarize myself with other subjects before delving back in), skimmed a couple Python books, and am currently reading Hacking: The Art of Exploitation 2nd Edition.

dynamik: I've tried to just dive into Wireshark before, but at that time I had no idea what ARP or ICMP were, so I'll have to try it again one byte at a time (lolz).
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Mightygreen

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Post Tue Aug 20, 2013 5:10 am

Re: New here + books

Hmm...here's a thought. Since (in my opinion) knowing how to get started in the subject of Pen Testing and general hacking is difficult because of the wide range of subjects that you need to know (at least to be good at it, not just a 'script kiddie' if I understand the definition correctly) I was wondering if there is a tree diagram (or some other form of easy to read visual format) with subjects and possibly associated certs (as I understand currently there are many certs that go with being a good pen tester?) to help n00bs like me. If there is not one currently would it be able to be made fairly easily by one of the more experienced people on the forums?
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dynamik

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Post Tue Aug 20, 2013 11:43 am

Re: New here + books

The day you stop learning is the day you start becoming obsolete.
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Mightygreen

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Post Tue Aug 20, 2013 11:47 pm

Re: New here + books

Thats pretty much exactly what I was talking about! I haven't been able to find anything that has been concise and step-by-step before. Thanks!

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