source code?

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    • #6877
      SephStorm
      Participant

      Does anyone know if there is a repository of exploit code in different languages? Maybe a searchable one?I am (very slowly) trying to learn C++, but i think that im going to come to a point where I need to see it in use in my desired work arena. Anyway, I know most code is written in python/perl, but they seemed a little less readable to me, and the guides seemed written for people who had exp with programming.

    • #42506
      cd1zz
      Participant

      Like you said, most are written in scripting languages. It also depends on the author. I usually only see C++ when custom Trojans are created, not very often for exploits.

      I’m sure you’re already aware of exploit-db.com packetstormsecurity.org osvdb.org and securityfocus.com.

      You might want to try some google searches like:

      *.cpp site:packetstormsecurity.org
      *.cpp site:exploit-db.com

      Those bring up a few results…..

    • #42507
      SephStorm
      Participant

      awesome ideas! Do you think its nessesary to know a language like C++ before learning scripting? Or have a good zero to primer on scripting?

    • #42508
      cd1zz
      Participant

      Sorta depends on what you’re doing. But if you’re just modifying and writing exploits, I’d start with scripting. I think its 1000 times easier than C++, but that’s just my opinion.

    • #42509
      mambru
      Participant

      Like cd1zz says, it depends on what you are doing or what you want to achieve. It’s not necessary to learn C/C++ before any scripting language, but definitely it will come handy at some point, so I’d suggest to go for it.

    • #42510
      SephStorm
      Participant

      hmm. Well lets ask the other side of the question, would learning scripting help me learn traditional programming languages?

      And could use a good primer for python, from a real dummy, basic view.

    • #42511
      mambru
      Participant

      I think learning a language is only a matter of learning its syntax, capabilities, drawbacks and use of available libraries, but what it’s more important is knowing how to program, being able to design algorithms. So if you have a problem, you can grab any book about the language you want and after a few tries you’ll have some code working. Of course you may face some obstacles an old seasoned programmer (in that language) wouldn’t, but that’s something that comes with experience. In short, I don’t think learning a given language first will make your life easier when learning another one.

      Regarding Python, I recommend:

      http://www.amazon.com/Learning-Python-Powerful-Object-Oriented-Programming/dp/0596158068/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1317837492&sr=8-4

      http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Python-Mark-Lutz/dp/0596158106/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1317837492&sr=8-1

      http://www.doughellmann.com/PyMOTW/index.html

    • #42512
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @mambru wrote:

      I think learning a language is only a matter of learning its syntax, capabilities, drawbacks and use of available libraries, but what it’s more important is knowing how to program, being able to design algorithms.

      This is generally true. I have found that scripting is just as easy as coding and really it depends what your end goal is. Most w/ a sysadmin background start with scripting as it seems a more natural progression.

    • #42513
      Triban
      Participant

      I will +1 the scripting route as well, but also +1 the “depends on what you want to do.”  But yes, scripting will give you some basic programming knowledge or principles and such and yes if you look programming code and scripting code side-by-side, it will look pretty similar in its design and such. 

      I am actually learning Python now using http://learnpythonthehardway.org/ – the html book is free but if you like the hardcopy you can purhcase that or the PDF.  Just be careful with Python, I would recommend sticking to 2.6-2.7 since there are annoying changes in 3.0 which make learning something new sort of a PITA when the reading material is not up to snuff.  Also you can check out Dive Into Python but the online version seems to have been removed. 

    • #42514
      SephStorm
      Participant

      Thanks all for the advice. 🙂

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