Some Questions Encountered – CPTS

This topic contains 6 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 13 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #543
     Dengar13 
    Participant

    My buddy just recently took the CPTS exam cold (did not attend the class) and received a 73% and needed an 80%, not too shabby for not attending the training.  He said some questions were:

    What port does 007shell use?

    What is the exact syntax to execute netcat on port 777 using UDP and executing cmd.exe?

    Or they tell you that from a packet capture you determine that a server’s IP headers are 20 bytes and its data grams are 84 bytes.  Is it Windows 2000, NT, 98 or Linux?

    They show you a dump of a TCP header and ask you if it is ipv4 or ipv6.

    I will try to pick his brain and see if I can get more.  i would love to get some practice questions for this since it seems very hard to find any info regarding this.  All i can say is that I am very motivated to attend this class and can’t wait to share my experiences.  I wold imagine that it is similar to CEH but more updated in content.  I am going to re-read Hacking Exposed, 5th edition and this Pen-Testing book I bought for my company.  PCSneaker said it was SQL heavy when he took the beta exam so I will definitely have to bone up on that.  Hopefully this will spark something up in terms of discussion.   ;D

    Don….just read the sticky for this part of the forum and apologize for posting it in the worng spot, feel free to move this to the appropriate part of the forum. 

  • #9673
     pcsneaker 
    Participant

    What port does 007shell use?

    007shell doesn’t use any port, it uses icmp echo replys.

    What is the exact syntax to execute netcat on port 777 using UDP and executing cmd.exe?

    nc -u -l -p 777 -e cmd.exe

    Or they tell you that from a packet capture you determine that a server’s IP headers are 20 bytes and its data grams are 84 bytes.  Is it Windows 2000, NT, 98 or Linux?

    The IP header is always 20 Byte, regardless if it’s Windows or Linux, so that doesn’t help to determine what operating system is sending that packet. A typical use for a datagram with 84 Bytes is an ICMP echo packet in Linux (20 Byte IP-Header+8 Byte ICMP-Header+ 56 Bytes ICMP Data) whereas a Windows ICMP echo packet is 60 Bytes in length.

    They show you a dump of a TCP header and ask you if it is ipv4 or ipv6.

    A TCP header is not different in IPv4 or IPv6, so with just a TCP header one can not differenciate between IPv4 and IPv6. In an IP header the first 4 Bits are the version field (4 in IPv4 and 6 in IPv6) so you can easily spot the version (and the IPv4 header is only 20 Bytes in contrast to 40 Byte for the IPv6 main header).

  • #9674
     oyle 
    Participant

    Y’know, in an “ethical” envbironment, discussing test questions not a cool thing to do. They may not be actual test questions word-for-word, but just to remind you guys. I know this is a learning website, but just keep it in the backs of your minds…….

    Not trying to be the Test Police, just trying to stay “Ethical”.

  • #9675
     Dengar13 
    Participant

    Sorry everyone…  :-[

  • #9676
     Don Donzal 
    Keymaster

    I had no problem with your post. They seemed general enough. Plus, the exam is multiple choice, and you didn’t the 4 or so answers that may come with the questions. It appeared to be more of a discussion of a topic rather than a specific exam question.

    No worries,
    Don

  • #9677
     oyle 
    Participant

    OK!  ;D  Good enogh for Don, good enough for me!!!

    ‘Nuff said.

  • #9678
     Anonymous 
    Participant

    i recently took and passed my CPTS exam, those are pretty close to the questions i saw as well.  i took several covert channel questions as well.  i did self study and did not take a class.  over all i felt the test was better than the CEH test (i took and passed v3 exam) being, in general, more concept oriented instead of tool oriented.  which is a good thing IMO.

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