Noob Question

This topic contains 18 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Pookie 8 years, 10 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #5921
     TechMonK3y 
    Participant

    I have been researching and researching on what schools are the best for training in ethical hacking or pentesting  and have still came up empty. I mean which one is better to have i know some parts are the same but then you have offensive security with their version of pentesting with back track. Any info on this would help especially if you have completed some of these certs

  • #37090
     Michael J. Conway 
    Participant

    What industry are you looking to get into?  The DoD recognizes a few certifications as meeting training requirements.  CEH, CISSP, and CompTIA Security + are just a few. This is not an all inclusive list but it may help. However, any Ethical Hacking cert will help you gain more knowledge.  The Offsec cert is a great cert and is very hands on.  It is not for some one new to Linux or ethical hacking. Before going straight to the hacking certs, look at the Security+ and the Network+ certs.  Then build from there.

  • #37091
     TechMonK3y 
    Participant

    I am just looking to expand my areas I have a degree in networking and currently work in that field just trying to get some ideas on what next i heard that the OffSec was tough i do have some knowledge of linux not as much as i would like to

  • #37092
     rabray 
    Participant

    Install linux on a laptop or your home system and get started.

    I would also recommend reading the CEH materials as a good place to start, you do get a broad understanding of various issues around security.

    eCPPT is also good in terms of making you focus on web application testing and the security issues surrounding this area, which realy should become more of a challenge and focused role as more people move into the “cloud”.

  • #37093
     Pookie 
    Participant

    @rabray wrote:

    Install linux on a laptop or your home system and get started.

    I have been using Ubuntu/Mint Linux as my primary OS(es) for almost 2 years but don’t feel like I truly know Linux since most of what I use is accessed through the graphical interface.  What commands and skills would you suggest I look into?  I was thinking of getting some books for the Comptia Linux+ cert, since that gets 3 certs for the price of one.  do you think that would help me learn best?

  • #37094
     RoleReversal 
    Participant

    Pookie,

    in my experience trying to ‘learn’ Linux never works, as I can’t retain anything I learn for when I actually need to use the knowledge in real life. Only way I can improve my Linux skills is to actually use it.

    If you’re mostly using the GUI, don’t (I know, sorry) try running on a system without a GUI (all my servers are CLI only), for example take advantage of one of the many free/cheap virtual service hosts and use that to setup something that you’re interested in. Or if you don’t have a project in mind, setup a LAMP system to run a wiki/blog for you to record the skills/knowledge you’re learning whilst doing it.

    The knowledge comes with time, in my case I was working on a system (throwing commands at it, seeing what it does) and had an out of body experience, “when did I learn to do that?”. It’s easier to learn when you don’t know you’re learning.

  • #37095
     ziggy_567 
    Participant

    I’m not that familiar with the Linux+ certification, but I can tell you that Linux is really pretty easy to learn once you get your hands dirty a bit. My advice would be to stop relying on the GUI for day-to-day maintenance of your destkop. If you need to update some software, don’t use the graphical aptitude repositories, see what you can do on the command line. It may take longer, but you’ll get more comfortable with the command line over time, and eventually it becomes faster to use the command line for a lot of things.

    Another thing you can do, turn off automatic log rotation and write your own script to do this. This is on a junior sysadmin level of task, so its definitely doable. In fact, google will likely spoonfeed you pretty much whatever you need. But, this is a great exercise to teach yourself shell scripting. You will be amazed at how quickly you’ll be able to string a bunch of commands together to accomplish a single task once you become somewhat proficient at shell scripting, because that’s basically all you’re doing with a shell script.

    Another idea to learn command line. Build a VM without installing Gnome or KDE. Then set up an LAMP server on it. You don’t have to actually do anything in depth with html/mysql/php. Just get a very rudimentary website setup. You’ll learn a lot about the command line doing this.

    Feel free to PM me if you need anything.

  • #37096
     DrivinTin 
    Participant

    In my opinion if you are going to really learn linux you don’t go with Ubuntu or some other drop in install.  Go grab the min install cd of Gentoo and work your way through the install guide.  Not only will it help you setup a base system, but Gentoo has an amazing amount of HOWTOs and a great community for trouble shooting issues.

  • #37097
     Pookie 
    Participant

    I am getting a new computer (to me anyway) soon so I will have an opportunity to do these things,  since my old computer is an ancient beast and can barely handle one OS, much less virtual machines. 

    Thanks to those who have replied to my Linux questions and I hope more people add their opinions and advice.

  • #37098
     hell_razor 
    Participant

    @drivintin wrote:

    In my opinion if you are going to really learn linux you don’t go with Ubuntu or some other drop in install.  Go grab the min install cd of Gentoo and work your way through the install guide.  Not only will it help you setup a base system, but Gentoo has an amazing amount of HOWTOs and a great community for trouble shooting issues.

    Ever heard of learning to crawl before you walk?  Throwing a new user in a minimal install in Gentoo may not be the best way to get a long term user.  I would say that installing any current mainstream enthusiast distro (ubuntu,fc,suse,etc) would be sufficient.  It will allow the user to have ease of use and still allow the user to compile code, update the kernel, etc. at their own pace.

    This is kind of like learning to ride a motorcycle for the first time on a modern sportbike…it can be done, but may also result in a quick death.

  • #37099
     DrivinTin 
    Participant

    @hell_razor wrote:

    Ever heard of learning to crawl before you walk?  Throwing a new user in a minimal install in Gentoo may not be the best way to get a long term user.  I would say that installing any current mainstream enthusiast distro (ubuntu,fc,suse,etc) would be sufficient.  It will allow the user to have ease of use and still allow the user to compile code, update the kernel, etc. at their own pace.

    This is kind of like learning to ride a motorcycle for the first time on a modern sportbike…it can be done, but may also result in a quick death.

    I agree if the user is a new linux user, but the reply was more at Pookie.  He said he had been using Ubuntu for over 2 years, but feels like he still doesn’t know linux that well because of the GUI. Walking through the Gentoo install guide is not daunting at all, it walks you through the entire process telling you every command to type. If you find that overwhelming then I think the Linux+ might not be for you.

  • #37100
     hell_razor 
    Participant

    Just because Ubuntu/Mint have GUIs doesn’t mean he should jump ship on the distro and move to something else.  He can learn everything he needs to in Ubuntu/Mint, he just needs to take the time to do so.  I am not trying to start a distro war or anything like that, at the root they are all about the same.  However, if I was looking to learn more about linux from nearly any front (support, pen testing, etc) I would look to redhat, centos, and debian based distros because that is what you will see more of in the wild.  If I were to branch someone out, I would send them to BSD world rather than some other linux distro.  Did not mean to start a fight or anything.

  • #37101
     ziggy_567 
    Participant

    Awwww….come on….DamnSmallLinux is where its at for building Desktops!

    Linux is Linux…If you learn one, you can easily learn another…

  • #37102
     DrivinTin 
    Participant

    Haha, you are not a real man until you build your own Linux from Scratch!

    hell_razor: I completely agree about being familiar with Redhat/CentOS/Debian, that is pretty much all you will find, and knowing the ends and outs is going to help you the most.

    Now can someone find a great pic that shows a distro war? 🙂

  • #37103
     Pookie 
    Participant

    oops, I started a distro fight…  Sorry  :-[

    I really do appreciate the input, I will likely set up a virtual machine on my new lappy with some minimal install (the Gentoo solution sounds interesting, and I have another target vm to practice on when I am done).  I also found some stuff at http://training.linuxfoundation.org/ to look into.

    I have been branching over to the terminal for stuff (changing permissions, wget, iwconfig, and I think mtr is awesomely neat)  vi keeps throwing me off though but practice brings familiarity. 

  • #37104
     ziggy_567 
    Participant

    Oh….now you’ve opened the proverbial can’o’worms!!! YOU MENTIONED “VI”!!!!!!

    What’s wrong with gedit? kate? emacs? nano? pico? 😛

    I’m just kidding….I’ve never been an evangelist for distros or text editors, but distro wars is nothing compared to text editor wars!!!

  • #37105
     DrivinTin 
    Participant

    Oh man, here I will admit I am lazy! I am a total ‘nano’ person.

  • #37106
     Xen 
    Participant

    The way I learned, and still learning Linux is via programming. If you’ve or want to gain some programming experience you can follow the similar approach.

    Grab a good *nix programming book.  The book most often recommended is Advanced Programming in the UNIX(R) Environment (W. Stevens) http://www.amazon.com/Programming-Environment-Addison-Wesley-Professional-Computing/dp/0201563177

    If the above book appears a bit lengthy for you then you can try “Advanced Linux programming” which I’m reading right now. It’s freely available at the following URL http://www.advancedlinuxprogramming.com/alp-folder Don’t be fooled by its title though. It’s a beginner book but covers all the necessary aspects of Linux programming in about 250-300 pages.

    IMHO this ‘programming approach’ has multiple benefits over the ‘learning the commands approach’.
    a) You learn to program: Books like these get you out of the learning the syntax phase and helps you focus on building actual applications. Programming experience will be very useful if you ever want to get into reverse engineering or software exploitation.

    b) You learn the ‘OS’: Instead of just focusing on the commands of an OS you learn how the OS implements these commands in general.

    c) You learn the ‘commands’: Most of the Linux commands are nothing but wrappers on the Linux API. By actually learning the API you’ll learn the commands easily. Also, instead of blindly running a command it helps you to understand what actually happens when a command is run.

    d) You focus on Linux: Instead of pondering over various distributions you’ll focus on Linux itself.

    e) You’ll retain the concepts (and commands :P): By practicing the programs in the book – and creating your own – you’ll retain the concepts for a much longer period than just reading just another *nix book.

  • #37107
     Pookie 
    Participant

    @ziggy_567 wrote:

    Oh….now you’ve opened the proverbial can’o’worms!!! YOU MENTIONED “VI”!!!!!!

    What’s wrong with gedit? kate? emacs? nano? pico? 😛

    I’m just kidding….I’ve never been an evangelist for distros or text editors, but distro wars is nothing compared to text editor wars!!!

    ;D I know, I figured I started one war, I’d bite and go for the big one.  What can I say, I’m trouble through and through  ;D

    Equinx3n-, I have an associates in programming (I don’t use, it was all M$ Visual suite stuff plus a smattering of Javascript and I didn’t really get an idea at the time on how to effectively use my little skillset).  I understand the basics of programming and have been considering brushing up, since it’s been almost 10 years since I graduated. 

    I have been fiddling around with learning Python, which seems pretty usable so far.  I will check out your suggestions (especially the free one  🙂 )

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Copyright ©2019 Caendra, Inc.

Contact Us

Thoughts, suggestions, issues? Send us an email, and we'll get back to you.

Sending

Sign in with Caendra

Forgot password?Sign up

Forgot your details?