Network Monitor

Viewing 24 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #5958
      nilo
      Participant

      I am a network administrator. I would like to monitor all user laptops and computers connected to my network. I have installed a software to take desktop screen shots, but it is not able to install client program in vista laptop remotely without the knowledge of the user. Since I am the network administrator i have the domain admin user id and pwd, im able to install client program in some pcs on thro’ domain admin pwd. Please help me out to monitor my network.

      Thanks in advance,

    • #37268
      rattis
      Participant

      Is there a reason to take screen shots of the PC?

      For network monitoring, I usually use the following:
      Catci, BandwidthD and ntop for network graphs
      syslog for firewalls, switches and routers.
      tcpdump and wireshark for taffic captures.
      arpwatch and port controls to limit what can be plugged into the network
      tripwire (on the monitor box) for file integerty
      nagios

      I wouldn’t mind putting a SIEM in place, or something else to look at netflow. Spiceworks looks to be pretty good too.

    • #37269
      nilo
      Participant

      I would like to get periodical screen shots.

      More than that Is there a way to access the files in their systems(XP/VISTA)?

    • #37270
      tturner
      Participant

      @chrisj wrote:

      Spiceworks looks to be pretty good too.

      It may have changed in the last 3 years or so, but last time I looked at Spiceworks it was doing targeted marketing based on what it saw in your environment which raised a red flag with me. I don’t feel the need to share the intimate details of my internal network with a 3rd party.

    • #37271
      rattis
      Participant

      @nilo wrote:

      I would like to get periodical screen shots.

      More than that Is there a way to access the files in their systems(XP/VISTA)?

      Why do you need to? Why do you need screen shots. That sounds more like abusing being an admin than actual administration to me. (Hint in 14 years I’ve never needed screens shots).

      I guess so we can answer your question better, we should ask what it is you’re trying to do and what management wants.

    • #37272
      nilo
      Participant

      There is no question of abusing. Management want periodicall screenshot of users to see how the user working.

      They want to see their PC file contents also time to time, coz their users work mostly involved with network files rather than local drive files

    • #37273
      rattis
      Participant

      @nilo wrote:

      There is no question of abusing. Management want periodicall screenshot of users to see how the user working.

      They want to see their PC file contents also time to time, coz their users work mostly involved with network files rather than local drive files

      Hmmm.. in other words a kind of place that doesn’t sound like it’s worth working at. (My opinion).

      So lets see… based on your questions.

      Software install:
      Only ways I can think of to install the software is via GPO, or you can announce that you need the boxes to install software.

      Seeing drives:
      You’ll probably want to script it out. Look into Microsoft UNC. With the Domain admin account you can see unshared drives.

    • #37274
      ziggy_567
      Participant

      You’re also opening yourself up to legal battles if you do not have the right policies in place that are acknowledged by your co-workers. It sounds like you don’t have these as you’re trying to install software without the employee’s knowledge.

      Just know that any evidence you put forth in a court of law will likely not stand to the rule of evidence if the employee did not know his/her actions were being monitored. In the case of a wrongful termination suit, your company could be out some big money without any proof.

    • #37275
      tturner
      Participant

      I would highly recommend you tell management why you think it’s a bad idea via email and print out the response you get and keep it in a safe place for a rainy day. Sounds like a disaster waiting to happen, and Ziggy is right, the company could be faced with some serious legal issues but don’t think for a minute that they won’t throw you under the bus if it comes to that. Actually, scratch that first sentence. You should probably just find another job. I could not work in an environment that oppressive. I have to wonder if the employees are aware.

    • #37276
      rattis
      Participant

      @tturner wrote:

      @chrisj wrote:

      Spiceworks looks to be pretty good too.

      It may have changed in the last 3 years or so, but last time I looked at Spiceworks it was doing targeted marketing based on what it saw in your environment which raised a red flag with me. I don’t feel the need to share the intimate details of my internal network with a 3rd party.

      http://www.spiceworks.com/privacy/

      Brought it up on twitter (follow someone else that uses it, and spiceworks themselves. That link was the end response from Spiceworks).

    • #37277
      rattis
      Participant

      Glad I’m not the only one that thinks nilo’s job sucks.

      Remember. Your job as an admin isn’t to make your bosses happy, it’s to keep the company running. Sometimes it is hard for them to know the difference. The get the CYA documentation is a good thing. Because when (not if, WHEN) a lawsuit happens they will be looking for a sacrifice, and chances are you’ll be it.

      Also keep those documents stored somewhere other than your office. Safety Deposit box, and don’t let them know you’ve got copies.

      Also, beware if the AUP isn’t enforced across the board. We have that problem where I’m at. Some people are “Exempt from the AUP”, while others have lost their jobs over it.

      Seriously though, sit down with them and find a better way, or find a new job.

    • #37278
      Clay Briggs
      Participant

      I would have to agree with the above comments.  The more responses I see to the member questions though, the more leery I am to respond especially with any help.  Unless English is a second language, and if so please ignore this; the use of ‘coz’ and general grammatical/structural laziness leads me to assume someone younger than a network admin is behind the posting.  Sorry if English is your second language, and please do ignore my suspicions if that is the case.

    • #37279
      rattis
      Participant

      @Gere1 wrote:

      what about bandwidth monitor you can try use ProteMac Meter http://protemac.com/Meter/.It;s really nice prog)

      Based on a quick look at your link. It looks to be a MAC only product.

    • #37280
      rattis
      Participant

      @g00d_4sh

      I’m taking him as either a noob (fresh out of highschool, limited admin skills) or non-english speaker.

      but a little leery enough to not give him more information on how to do what he’s trying.

    • #37281
      caissyd
      Participant

      I have installed a software to take desktop screen shots, but it is not able to install client program in vista laptop remotely without the knowledge of the user.

      You guys are too nice, this guy is an !

      Don’t even reply to his emails. If you analyze his writting, he is almost certainly the same guy who wrote a few questionable posts on this forum in the last 2 months. Same patern: 1) create a new account, 2) post an unethical question, 3) once we realize it, he disapears.

      Look around, we have seen this quite often recently…

      And BTW, English is my second language (so sorry for the typos everywhere!), but I am mature enough not to write posts like this. So to me, a young “wanna be” black hat…

    • #37282
      tturner
      Participant

      @chrisj wrote:

      @tturner wrote:

      @chrisj wrote:

      Spiceworks looks to be pretty good too.

      It may have changed in the last 3 years or so, but last time I looked at Spiceworks it was doing targeted marketing based on what it saw in your environment which raised a red flag with me. I don’t feel the need to share the intimate details of my internal network with a 3rd party.

      http://www.spiceworks.com/privacy/

      Brought it up on twitter (follow someone else that uses it, and spiceworks themselves. That link was the end response from Spiceworks).

      I’m not crazy about the idea of trusting Spiceworks to use my information responsibly. Why engage in a trust relationship unless you have to? I’d rather install an application that is used internally that doesn’t phone home to anyone. Having their privacy policy tell me they won’t share the information with anyone is not enough. And if you read the privacy policy they do state:

      If our company should ever file for bankruptcy or be a party to a merger or acquisition, we may share the information you provide to us to a third party in connection with such activity.

      You may want to have a look at the trust metrics portion of http://www.isecom.org/osstmm/

    • #37283
      Clay Briggs
      Participant

      Hey H1t M0nk3y,

      Good reply, and I didn’t mean that those with English as a second language always have errors or anything.  Your responses have been very well written as I have seen thus far.  I try to give a bit more slack to those who have English as a second language, since I figure the Spanish speakers that read what I write where I am currently, probably cringe once in a while heh. 

      I suppose in his case, he’s using more youth slang and such rather than grammatical errors, though there were some missing words etc in his sentences which made me assume perhaps an ESL case.  None the less, it did not strike me as the writting of someone who would be given responsibility over the network of any company.

    • #37284
      yatz
      Participant

      For good measure, I wanted to say that there are reasons for taking snapshots of desktop computers.  Many VoIP call recording software companies also provide computer recording as an add-on.  Look at NICE, TelRex and Syn-Apps.

      We have implemented a similar solution for the purposes of training users on proper everyday usage of business systems.  I have also used it to rearrange the business systems screen/tab order so it more adequately reflects how a normal sales call flows.

      As a side effect, it is also able to verify sales employees are not surfing CNN during work hours.  Corporate spying does not apply if you are not selective and if it is publicly announced in the handbook.  Work computers are used for work purposes, and the lunch hour is for private internet access.  As long as our screen recording does not happen during 12pm-1pm, we are obeying our own rules.

    • #37285
      rattis
      Participant

      @g00d_4sh wrote:

      I suppose in his case, he’s using more youth slang and such rather than grammatical errors, though there were some missing words etc in his sentences which made me assume perhaps an ESL case.  None the less, it did not strike me as the writting of someone who would be given responsibility over the network of any company.

      You’d be surprised. The area I’m in they teach CCNA and MCSE in high school now. They’re also posting jobs for about 30K a year for admins. Places like that are only going to get the younger high school students.

      One place I worked for, hired people that didn’t know much and taught them what the company thought they needed to know. Management figured they could always get students (high school or college) for cheap. It was also just as draconian in practices for computer usage.

      I did learn a lot there, and I wouldn’t be where I am today if it wasn’t for them. But I was happy to leave. Stopped drinking as heavily too… 🙂

    • #37286
      caissyd
      Participant

      I didn’t mean that those with English as a second language always have errors or anything

      @g00d_4sh: No worries, I didn’t took it the wrong way.  🙂

      I was only trying to demonstrate that typos are normal when writting in other langages, but explaining that you want to “hack” people for a company is quite bad…  😛

    • #37287
      Clay Briggs
      Participant

      Quite true H1t M0nk3y.  I guess hiring practices sometimes do go for cheapest labor over other factors.  I guess where i got into computers.. that would not fly.  There are schools in Seattle that teach CCNA and whatnot in highschool as well, but generally the kids coming out of the highschool didn’t go right into a Network Admin spot, unless it was at Joe’s computer repair shop… and then the network was a router and a switch, and a few boxes getting worked on.  Good point though that different areas have different computer cultures heh. 

    • #37288
      ziggy_567
      Participant

      @yatz

      The key to your arguement is that the policy is in the employee handbook and that the policy is acknowledged (in writing) by each employee. If you have that in place, go for it! Run camtasia 24×7 on every desktop. You’re good to go.

      The OP, however, insinuated that the users should know nothing about what he’s doing. This is a completely different ball of wax!

    • #37289
      Don Donzal
      Keymaster

      I’m with ziggy on this one. Not only should the policy be clearly written but also be communicated with the employees. If not, then the network admin should take it upon himself to either tell them or quit.

      In these tough times, quitting is easier said than done. so giving proper information to management is the right call. Let them know that they may be inadvertantly opening themselves up for major law suits and loss of reputation and $$$$. That should not only open their eyes, but it should also show them how much you’re thinking about them, the company & last but not least the employees.

      Don

    • #37290
      rattis
      Participant

      Just because they get a list of the rules, doesn’t mean that they read them.

      Had a case come up between last week and this week. Some people, newer hires, are listening / watching streaming media. Handbook and AUP says it’s not allowed. Manager talked to offender on his staff. The reply was I didn’t read it, I just signed the papers.

    • #37291
      ziggy_567
      Participant

      In a court of law, your signature on a statement that reads “I have read the above blahblahblah” will be upheld. An employee claiming ignorance when they have signed a copy of the policy will not. I am not naive enough to believe just because its signed the employee has read and understands everything, but the company has done its due diligence.

Viewing 24 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Copyright ©2020 Caendra, Inc.

Contact Us

Thoughts, suggestions, issues? Send us an email, and we'll get back to you.

Sending

Sign in with Caendra

Forgot password?Sign up

Forgot your details?