How paranoid has your information security career made you?

Viewing 15 reply threads
  • Author
    Posts
    • #4721
      unsupported
      Participant

      My information security career has made me very paranoid!  For example, I only read my email in plain text to prevent any rogue links or other issues.  I also use Firefox with add-ons like No Script and Ad-Block Plus.  At home, I have replaced Adobe Reader with FoxIt Reader and I am in the middle of looking for an Adobe Flash replacement (Gnash seems appropriate).

      I still use Windows Firewall because I’ve been lazy about finding a replacement, and I prefer to use OpenOffice at home as well.

      In regards to hardware, I just bought a Kensington lock because I am bringing my laptop to school.

      What paranoia have you been driven to since you know all the evils of the internet?

    • #29420
      hayabusa
      Participant

      I wouldn’t say it’s made me paranoid.  In my case, though, I pay close attention to my boxes, anyway.  (My primary machine is Linux – has been, will be for the foreseeable future.)  I run Apparmour on top of it, and I regularly monitor my logs on the machine, etc.  But I certainly worry a bit more about my kids’ PC’s, as they haven’t moved to Linux yet, and I DO run a number of utils their boxes to monitor and protect…   😉

    • #29421
      blackazarro
      Participant

      Same here, thanks to what I do, I’m more aware of the threats that exist out there and I feel confident that my computers are well protected. Now, that doesn’t mean that my computers aren’t vulnerable, there’s always a way in but at least I have the necessary protections in place to make my computers hard to hack into.

    • #29422
      Ketchup
      Participant

      I use only the Lynx browser.

    • #29423
      Anonymous
      Participant

      @Ketchup wrote:

      I use only the Lynx browser.

      Pfft! Real hackers use netcat for surfing teh interwebs.

    • #29424
      partek
      Participant

      The more I learn, the more paranoid I become I think. I just finished PWB and learning just how easy client side attacks are really kicked up the paranoia a bit..

    • #29425
      n0on3
      Participant

      I think paranoia is part of my nature, knowing how (some) things works and “be aware of which the threats may be” just gives you a better chance to avoid them and be somehow more serene…

      I mean, if i don’t know what’s going on with something that manage anything important to me, i’ll probably be more ‘paranoid’ than knowing what is the risk and what i can do in order to mitigate it, or why am i accepting that.
      This is just because i usually don’t trust what i don’t understand, and even less what i don’t know anything about.

      Obviously you can’t get deep knowledge about everything, but the more you know, the more you can be good at evaluating risks, and this should decrease your paranoia level.

      In short, there’s nothing bad in using countermeasures, but since some of them require time or resource charge or makes your experience poor, you shold become good to evaluate, case by case, when they are appropriate or not.

    • #29426
      zeroflaw
      Participant

      I’ve always been slightly paranoid when it comes to computers and what to trust. About a year ago I started checking security logs and processes that run on my system on a regular basis. Sometimes I even check open TCP connections 😛

      ZF

    • #29427
      j0rDy
      Participant

      @unsupported wrote:

      My information security career has made me very paranoid!  For example, I only read my email in plain text to prevent any rogue links or other issues.  I also use Firefox with add-ons like No Script and Ad-Block Plus.  At home, I have replaced Adobe Reader with FoxIt Reader and I am in the middle of looking for an Adobe Flash replacement (Gnash seems appropriate).

      I still use Windows Firewall because I’ve been lazy about finding a replacement, and I prefer to use OpenOffice at home as well.

      In regards to hardware, I just bought a Kensington lock because I am bringing my laptop to school.

      What paranoia have you been driven to since you know all the evils of the internet?

      all sounds very familiar! sometimes when i want to order stuff on the internet and see oscommerce i get suspicious! however, i think you can throw that kensington lock away, or did you get some improved version?

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0SkKJ4yOKo8

    • #29428
      teedge77
      Participant

      The Kensington lock is a deterrent, like the 4 foot fence around the building. It’ll stop some jackass from just walking away with it; but it won’t stop someone determined to get it. If they’re really determined…..they’ll just take it from you with force and go. The Kensington lock is better than nothing at all.

    • #29429
      unsupported
      Participant

      @teedge77 wrote:

      The Kensington lock is a deterrent, like the 4 foot fence around the building. It’ll stop some jackass from just walking away with it; but it won’t stop someone determined to get it. If they’re really determined…..they’ll just take it from you with force and go. The Kensington lock is better than nothing at all.

      All locks are just a deterrent or a method to slow someone down.  99% of the students at my school do not use locks like this.  If someone had the opportunity, would you rather take a computer with a lock or without?

      I am just using the lock for when I am in class and take a break, if I am in the library or open area the laptop comes with me.  I’m also going to use it in my next SANS class, so I do not have to carry around my laptop.

    • #29430
      teedge77
      Participant

      I am confused, were you agreeing with me? You restated exactly what I was saying.

      @unsupported wrote:

      @teedge77 wrote:

      The Kensington lock is a deterrent, like the 4 foot fence around the building. It’ll stop some jackass from just walking away with it; but it won’t stop someone determined to get it. If they’re really determined…..they’ll just take it from you with force and go. The Kensington lock is better than nothing at all.

      All locks are just a deterrent or a method to slow someone down.  99% of the students at my school do not use locks like this.  If someone had the opportunity, would you rather take a computer with a lock or without?

      I am just using the lock for when I am in class and take a break, if I am in the library or open area the laptop comes with me.  I’m also going to use it in my next SANS class, so I do not have to carry around my laptop.

    • #29431
      hayabusa
      Participant

      I think he was generally in agreement, and was solely noting that he’d prefer to at least have a deterrent, to slow down the probability of his being the first one in sight to be grabbed…

    • #29432
      rattis
      Participant

      I was paranoid before I started playing in InfoSec. First GSP NOC I worked for required us to be so.

      I’m using the same thing for browsing. on my laptop (main computer right now), I’m running linux, with denyhosts (running ssh open on the firewall on port 22), tripwire, snort, and logwatch.

      When I’m traveling with it, I use a live cd only.

    • #29433
      unsupported
      Participant

      @teedge77 wrote:

      I am confused, were you agreeing with me? You restated exactly what I was saying.

      Yes. 🙂 

    • #29434
      teedge77
      Participant

      Just checkin.  😉

      @unsupported wrote:

      @teedge77 wrote:

      I am confused, were you agreeing with me? You restated exactly what I was saying.

      Yes. 🙂 

Viewing 15 reply threads
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Copyright ©2020 Caendra, Inc.

Contact Us

Thoughts, suggestions, issues? Send us an email, and we'll get back to you.

Sending

Sign in with Caendra

Forgot password?Sign up

Forgot your details?