Google Dropping Windows For Internal Use

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    • #5130
      morpheus063
      Participant

      Even prior to their brush with hackers from China late last year Google had a policy of moving users on to Google products where possible. The incidents accelerated the process. The story quotes Google employees to the effect that Windows systems are distrusted by definition at the company.

      Something feels exaggerated in the story to me. First, from all indications we have in published reports, the system compromised at Google wasn’t just a Windows system, but a Windows XP system running Internet Explorer 6 and logged in as Administrator. In other words, it was a system on which no serious effort at security was made. Banning all Windows systems because of this is surely an irrational overreaction.

      Click here to continue reading.

      Does it sound strange?

    • #32502
      Ketchup
      Participant

      I was just reading this article and thinking about the same thing.

    • #32503
      former33t
      Participant

      I’m with you guys.  I think this is sensationalist journalism at its best (or at least as good as it gets when it comes to technical topics).  I strongly suspect the original article uses selective quoting quite liberally (where they only publish quotes from sources that support the article without acknowledging competing viewpoints).  Bad journalism.

    • #32504
      yatz
      Participant

      I can understand Google gradually moving to Chrome, but yeah there doesn’t need to be a big story about it.

      “Google would not comment on their current policy.”

      Makes me wonder what else is Google playing politics.

    • #32505
      Xen
      Participant

      Google’s response is somewhat exaggerated. They could’ve prevented the attack had they properly patched their systems and trained their employees. Much better option would be to move to Windows 7. Even in a company as big as Google not every employee would know how to use Linux. Though, I’m pretty sure employees won’t stop grinning if it’s replaced by Mac.

    • #32506
      secureseve
      Participant

      I heard that they also have “Goobuntu” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goobuntu

      which they use internally. If it’s similar to Ubuntu, I believe that average computer use in a work force can handle it. Firefox, and custom applications should be just as simple as click and launch. The desktop interface is similar to windows and shouldn’t be much more difficult to navigate.

      I personally admire the huge switch. Competition is healthy I believe. The only  problem I see is the cost of linux administration. Windows licensing can be expensive, but finding linux administrators are much more expensive than windows I believe from what I’ve read on job posting websites.

    • #32507
      rattis
      Participant

      @secureseven wrote:

      I heard that they also have “Goobuntu” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goobuntu

      which they use internally. If it’s similar to Ubuntu, I believe that average computer use in a work force can handle it. Firefox, and custom applications should be just as simple as click and launch. The desktop interface is similar to windows and shouldn’t be much more difficult to navigate.

      I personally admire the huge switch. Competition is healthy I believe. The only  problem I see is the cost of linux administration. Windows licensing can be cheap, but finding linux administrators are much more expensive than windows I believe from what I’ve read on job posting websites.

      I had to work on a project with Google once. The engineer I was working with had brought Gentoo servers with him, but said most of the stuff they ran was Straight Ubuntu. He wasn’t even sure why they were using Gentoo on the servers.

    • #32508
      hayabusa
      Participant

      I’m a Linux guy, myself (having very few Windows machines left in my home or office, aside of testing, and some things for my kids,) but am neither here nor there on this one. 

      For one, Google is used by billions of people, a large piece of whom run Windows, so to have NONE kind of defeats interface testing, etc, IMHO.  However, I also understand Google’s pain.  Recall, too, where their CEO (Eric Schmidt) came from, in his last endeavor…  They’re now primarily a Linux shop, as well, being as how they own SuSE (Novell,) even though that came about after he left.  And Schmidt has long been an open-source proponent, so I’m not surprised by this decision, as it falls in line with his past decisions and plans.

      Do I think it’s an over the top decision, based solely on the current dilemma that brought it about?  …perhaps.  But it’s the decision they chose to make, and they’ll have to work out the logistics and make it business-capable, whether it’s Linux, Mac, or the combination of the two.  Do I think they can do it? …most definitely.  I have been in developer forums and conferences with many of Google’s folks, and the mindsets and abilities are there, to easily transition them.  If given a good GUI environment, with proper tools, even their less ‘tech-savvy’ folks will be able to get past this choice, and be very productive, in the long run.

      So I think, in the long run, it will be a good move for them.  At the very LEAST, it’s going to save them some substantial capital $$$$.

    • #32509
      rattis
      Participant

      A co-worker pointed out (after he came down to tell me about seeing it in his rss feed).

      To a point it makes sense. Google is directly competing with Microsoft in a couple of areas. Browser, Documentation Sweets, instant messenger, email, and search. Why would they want to pay they’re competitor?

    • #32510
      morpheus063
      Participant

      An update on the issue

      Microsoft publicly defended Windows in the face of unconfirmed reports that Google was shunning the operating system due to security concerns.

      Google declined to respond to an AFP inquiry, saying only: “As a rule, we don’t comment on operational matters.”

      Microsoft, however, felt that stories published in the Financial Times and elsewhere warranted a fast, firm rebuttal.

      Microsoft defends windows security

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