Cutaway locks

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    • #6201
      WCNA
      Participant

      If you guys are interested in lock picking, the thing that has helped me most, by far, was the cutaway locks. I got a cheaper one than the Southord one encased in plastic but mine came with lots of extra pins so you could make it more difficult. Start with only a couple of pins to get the feel of how much pressure you should use (very little) and work your way up to 6 pins using both the rake method and individual pin picking with the hook pick. Then try putting short pins next to long pins….good luck with that!

      This method will have you picking most locks in no time. If they aren’t illegal in your state or it’s part of your job (you better have proof….just saying), learn how to use bump keys.

      Some cheap padlocks can be opened in a couple seconds using the jiggle method and as always, practice makes perfect.

    • #38723
      lorddicranius
      Participant

      Totally agree, cutaways have helped me a lot.  Seeing what’s going on inside the lock when I do certain things helps to picture in my head what may be going on when I’m picking a non-cutaway.

      Bumping is something I’ve read about and watched many talks on, but have yet to learn it myself.  One day…

    • #38724
      rattis
      Participant

      I don’t care for the clear / cut away ones myself. I spent years trying to pick my first pad lock. Now they’re fairly easy.

      What worked for me was getting Deviant’s book Practical Lock Picking. In it he talks about getting progressively pinned sets. You can actually make your own with a couple of dead bolts. Actually all you need is a double key dead bolt and you’ve got 2 locks that you can make changes to on a regular basis. Not that hard.

      Get the Defiant locks from Home Depot, and you get 2 security pins too.

      looking at the locks and seeing what’s going on makes it harder to do without looking later from what I’ve been told / read. The progressive kits makes it really easy. You get the feel for 1 pin at a time.

    • #38725
      hayabusa
      Participant

      Funny to see bump keys mentioned…  Just watched the Russell Crowe movie, that just came out on DVD (‘The Next Three Days’ – http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1458175/ – where his wife’s in prison for life, and he’s trying to spring her.)  He learns about what a bump key is, and tries his hand (successfully, I might add) at it, at one point.

    • #38726
      rattis
      Participant

      @hayabusa wrote:

      Funny to see bump keys mentioned…  Just watched the Russell Crowe movie, that just came out on DVD (‘The Next Three Days’ – http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1458175/ – where his wife’s in prison for life, and he’s trying to spring her.)  He learns about what a bump key is, and tries his hand (successfully, I might add) at it, at one point.

      They’re not that hard to make either. I have 3 locks with the same key 3 separate packages bought about a week apart. (think about that one bought 1, then week later bought other 2).

      Took one of the 6 keys and filed it down. Works too. Not easy, but I’ve opened the lock 3 times now.

    • #38727
      WCNA
      Participant

      I just saw that movie too. I was laughing my butt off at his lock picking and bump-keying. What’s up with the movie industry in this day and age? Do they really think that some kid was going to pause that movie and copy that phony bump key design when you can look up how to really do it on the internet? They could show someone really picking a lock and our fictional kid still wouldn’t be able to open a lock. This is one area that hands-on experience is absolutely necessary.

    • #38728
      WCNA
      Participant

      I started out trying to pick a padlock. I’d lay on the sofa watching TV and spend hours trying to crack that lock. After a month or so with no success, I bought a cutaway lock and right off the bat….”Ah-Ha! That’s how much tension you use, I do have to use more pressure here than I thought, etc”. That same night I cracked that $%&* padlock for the first time.

    • #38729
      Pookie
      Participant

      I too read Deviant Ollam’s book and recommend it highly.  he has a series of challenges that move you along quickly.

      I do not like the cut away lock, because no lock you see in the field will be visible.  I think they are only good for showing the basics of how a lock works, not practice.  I bought a lock that has up to 6 stacks and I can unscrew the top of the stack and repin.  the kit I got also came with pick resistant spool pins. 

      My 11 year old can pop 4 pins and my 8 year old got 3 pins after their first night with it.

    • #38730
      rattis
      Participant

      @Pookie wrote:

      My 11 year old can pop 4 pins and my 8 year old got 3 pins after their first night with it.

      I won’t say ages, but a guy in the Locksport group I started, gets really excited about picking locks. His wife did the drawings this book, but he was never able to get the locks picked. He started with 1 pin, got to 2. I think 3 is still giving him some trouble, but one of my padlocks only has 2 pins in it (Master Number 03) and he got excited when he picked it.

    • #38731
      timmedin
      Participant

      The cutaways are super nice for explaining lock picking to people who don’t understand it. Once they can see what is going on inside the lock it the whole process makes more sense. Plus, newbies can see what they are doing when first starting out.

    • #38732
      hayabusa
      Participant

      Yeah…  Something made much simpler when they see the pins moving, and can really watch what picks and / or bumping actually do. It’s fun stuff.

      I almost took a job, about 10 – 11 years ago, working for a locksmith.  My buddy still works there, and we chat now and then.  Some days, I think that could be a fun job, but IT security, to me is much more fun.  Maybe as a retirement gig…

    • #38733
      hell_razor
      Participant

      I have just started the new hobby, and am still learning about it.  It seems like a cutaway lock might also be helpful to learn the “feel” with immediate feedback.  What I mean is, you can watch the pins moving up and down, and when you see it bind and clear, you can feel it happen as well.  I can see where it would cause problems if you were only picking by watching the pins, but it seems like it would have a purpose other than that.  That said, I am also stuck between buying a cutaway or a set of progressive locks.  Wish I could rent a cutaway for a week or so… 🙂

    • #38734
      lorddicranius
      Participant

      If you can find a lockpick group in your area, I’m sure you could find someone there to let you test out a cutaway.  You could check this LockPicking101.com forum or just use some google-fu to see what you can find 🙂

      **EDIT**
      I guess “locksport” would be the term to use when researching for a local groups..?

    • #38735
      WCNA
      Participant

      It seems like a cutaway lock might also be helpful to learn the “feel” with immediate feedback.  What I mean is, you can watch the pins moving up and down, and when you see it bind and clear, you can feel it happen as well. 

      Exactly. That was my point- feel. Get a cutaway where you can change the pins to make it “progressive”. I can’t remember where I got mine from but A google search should find plenty. Here’s a bunch:

      http://www.lockpickshop.com/lock-cylinders.html

      Go ahead and pick up a plug spinner as well when you get your picks if you’re going to be using them in real life. Some locks pick better in one direction than the other.

    • #38736
      timmedin
      Participant

      @WCNA wrote:

      Exactly. That was my point- feel. Get a cutaway where you can change the pins to make it “progressive”.

      I got this one:
      http://www.lockpickshop.com/EZPLX.html

      It is great and I can swap out pins so I can teach someone with two pins, but change them out so I practice with 6 pins with 1 or 2 being spool pins.

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